In LOVE BITES, Adrienne Barbeau once again mixes horror and suspense with a humorous commentary on the nature of celebrity and the entertainment industry. Publishers Weekly writes: "Barbeau drops plenty of Hollywood names to comic effect, and the fast and furious final pages will leave fans hoping for a third installment."

"A wild, tense, exciting ride that instantly grabs you by the neck and doesn't let go!" adds the acclaimed horror director Rob Zombie. Adrienne Barbeau

Romance Lovers had the great opportunity to interview this eclectic writer and actress. We are very pleased to be able to share with all our visitors our conversation.

Love Bites - The Story

Picking up where VAMPYRES OF HOLLYWOOD left off, LOVE BITES brings back the unlikely duo of Beverly Hills detective Peter King and Scream Queen Ovsanna Moore, the famous Hollywood actress and producer who just happens to be a 450-year-old vampyre.

It's only two weeks since Peter and Ovsanna faced off with the Cinema Slayer, and already life is getting complicated.

First there's the werewolf attack. Then a mutilated body at the Sportsmen's Lodge turns up. Not to mention the fact that several of Ovsanna's clan members, including Orson Welles and Mary Pickford, are vying for attention. All of this makes it hard for Peter and Ovsanna to get together. And it doesn't help that Ovsanna's personal assistant and sometimes lover, Maral, will do anything to get Peter out of the picture.

Peter and Ovsanna have to fight for their relationship and their lives. Ovsanna enlists her clan, the Vampyres of Hollywood, to help battle a menagerie of supernatural beasts straight out of Alien vs. Predator. This isn't a box-office ratings war, it's a fight to the death.



The 1897 Bram Stoker 's Dracula and the Muranu's silent film Nosferatu: how did they influence your view of vampires, if they did, and if not, what did?
I've not read Stoker's Dracula nor have I seen Nosferatu. Probably shouldn't admit that, but you asked. When I first sat down to write Vampyres of Hollywood, the only vampire novels I'd read were George R. R. Martin's Fevre Dream and Kim Newman's Ano Dracula. When time came to write Love Bites, I devoured myriad research books about vampires and werewolves, but I didn't reference any novels. I was probably more influenced by all the series thrillers I read, and all the roles I've done in my acting career.

The modern idea of the vampire is open to many different possibilities. What defines your personal idea of a vampire?
I guess my 'heroine' in "Love Bites" defines my idea of a vampire. She's a sensual, sexy, capable business woman with eating habits and a morality honed by 450 years of watching man's inhumanity to man. She's fairly fearless and definitely independent. Used to getting what she wants. Or taking it, if she has to. And she looks great for her age.

Do you feel that the unconscious desire to be "prey" contributed to the success of the vampire for a female audience?
I've never considered that women have an unconscious desire to be prey. I sure hope that's not true; it's certainly not for the women I know. In "Love Bites" it's the exact opposite: Ovsanna Moore is a female vampire with a wicked sense of humor and a strong sensuality, but she definitely doesn't see her lovers as prey.

We at Romance Lovers, love romance :-) Please give 3 good reasons why our visitors shouldn't miss your novel.
Imagine a man, George Clooney handsome, and a vampire who could give Angelina Jolie a run for her money, trying to fall in love - or at least make love - while being pursued by werewolves, a shape-shifting hillbilly, and a jealous personal assistant (she's the vampire's live-in lover). Or if you just want sex, instead of romance, there's always the scene in the shower.

How do you get inspiration for your ideas?
It sounds strange, but when I read Love Bites there are sentences and paragraphs I have no recollection of writing. I think I must get 'in the zone' and things end up on paper that I never anticipated or consciously aimed for. There's a lot of me in what I write - things that have happened to me or behavior I've observed in friends. I'm always fascinated with the reasons why people behave the way they do, what they're feeling, what drives them. In some ways, I approach writing a character the way I approach creating a role on screen: asking questions about how they feel, what they believe in, etc. And logic is very important to me. Logic is the thru-line I hang a lot of my writing on, especially when it comes to writing about the supernatural.

What are you working on now?
Right now I've joined the cast of General Hospital, playing the director of an international children's charity who has hired Brenda Barrett (Vanessa Marcil Giovinazzo) to be her goodwill amabassador, and is trying to protect Brenda from enemies of the charity. Once I settle into the work schedule, I'm thinking I'll get started writing again. A lot of people are asking for the next book in the series, so that may be what comes next.

Thank you Adrianne for your availability and best wishes for all your future projects.

More details about Adrienne Barbeau and her work can be found on http://www.abarbeau.com. You can also follow Adrienne on Twitter at twitter.com/abarbeau and "like" her on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Adrienne-Barbeau/146564835210.